Peanut chutney

 

Boil it, roast it, fry it, press into oil or better yet,  add some masalas and make a peanut chutney out of it. Peanuts are ubiquitous food items and everyone loves eating peanuts in their own way. And we know no two ways are the same. One of the most popular snacking items, peanuts are a part of our day-to-day lives. We use it, right from being sold as a salted and sand-roasted poor man's snack on the roadside to the most loved chakhna everywhere to making a healthy protein-rich salad with it for protein diet worshippers. 

The peanut also has this unique position in every household as a pantry essential and a must-have or many dishes; in chutneys and gravies for thickening, in poha and upma for the crunch or fried to be added to namkeens, and we cannot get enough of it most of the time.

Peanut chutney and its origins

 

But did you know the peanut is not an original Indian nut, unlike cashew?  Jesuit missionaries who came after Vasco de Gama introduced the crop to Indian soil. Another theory is that the humble peanut traveled via China or the Pacific islands from the central and south American regions.

Maharashtra quickly made this crop its own. The state is known as one of the highest growers of this oil seed, especially in the Desh region of the state. Peanuts are naturally a key ingredient in Maharashtrian cooking too. The locals use peanut or shengdana kut (coarse powder) in gravies and curries.  And the best way they enjoy their crop is to make a dry chutney out of it, which is super-tasty and healthy too!

5 benefits of peanut chutney

Most of the time, we are scared to add peanuts to our diets, since it is high in calories and unhealthy, but it is quite the opposite. Here is the list of ways peanut adds nutrition to our diets.  

A heart-healthy nut

 

A heart-healthy nut

It is proven that regular consumption of peanuts will help decrease the chance of heart-related ailments. Peanuts are made up of heart-healthy nutrients. They have antioxidant resveratrol, a healthy dose of unsaturated fats, magnesium, and copper, which contribute to keeping your heart healthy. They also contain adequate quantities of fiber, proteins, and monosaturated fats to keep your cholesterol level in check. Peanuts contain a good amount of amino acids and antioxidants that act as a protector for the inner lining of your arteries.

Excellent source of vegetarian protein

We all know the high protein content in peanuts makes them an ideal nut to be had daily. Peanuts are said to have 22 to 30 % of protein of their total calories. This helps build a healthier body and heals wounds faster, which is ideal for children and bodybuilders.

Make friends with the peanut for weight management

The high level of proteins and healthy unsaturated fats in peanuts helps keep you full for a longer time. Hence you won't feel hungry faster. Peanuts help fight the hunger hormone Ghrelin and increase the production of Peptide YY – a hormone that makes you feel full for a longer time.

For a sharper brain

Vitamin B1, folate, and niacin are the nutrients required to make you sharper, and peanuts are filled with them. These nutrients will also fight the decline of age-related cognitive functions as they contain resveratrol. Peanuts are also called mood food due to the uplifting polyphenols present in them.

Solid bones and brighter skin

Peanuts can assist in making your bones strong as they are rich in phosphorus and manganese. They also give you clear skin and help in removing toxins from the body. They also help in clearing wrinkles and fine lines on your face.

Now that you know the benefits, are you wondering how to make chutney?

Aazol's peanut chutney is the simplest and best way to get your healthy dose of proteins, fats and spice. It is a simple mix of spices and roasted peanuts. The peanut chutney recipe has cumin, dry red chillies, salt, coriander and cumin. Each element is roasted in a bit of oil and cooled, after which it is coarsely grounded in a mortar pastel or a mixie. You will get a clumpy mixture that smells excellent and tastes yummier. If you like a garlicky taste you can make garlic peanut chutney by adding garlic cloves while roasting.

 

Aazol's peanut chutney

 

Aazol's Solapuri Chutney Calories Count & Nutritional Value is  

 Carbohydrates 28.66%
Protein 31.98%
Total Fat 32.97%
Energy 539.29 kcal

 

Peanut chutney for dosa

We only know the coconut chutney, a wet, freshly grounded chutney, and the gunpowder chutney-a dry chutney made with lentils and dry spices. You can very well replace these chutneys with peanut chutney for idlis and dosas. Also, you can use this dry chutney to make onion or mint chutney without coconut. This peanut chutney without coconut is a wet variation that can be an excellent variation to the regular one.

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Exciting ways to enjoy Aazol's Peanut Chutney Dry

You will enjoy it with your daily dal chawal or roti sabzi for sure. You can be innovative and eat it in different ways. Here are our personal favorites from Aazol's team to enjoy this dry chutney

  1. Sprinkle some on a warm khakhra after spreading some desi ghee.
  2. Some of us love to munch on peanut chutney while chilling.
  3. Make a cheesy, crunchy dip with mayo or hung curd.
  4. Use it as a salad topping.
  5. Make a stuffing for meats and fish.

Now you must be wondering how long does peanut chutney last? It lasts a good six months in an airtight container, but there is no chance that it will last that long. We assure you it will be over long before that. Aazol gets this Solapuri Peanut Chutney from the original place where this crop is grown. The recipe used to make it has been used since time immemorial and it is also made by hand in small batches so that the freshness is intact. This is what lends the chutney the 'Ghar jaisa swad'.

 

 Author: Jinal Aidasani